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A Paragraph On Homework Is Necessary ((FREE))



Homework battles have raged for decades. For as long as kids have been whining about doing their homework, parents and education reformers have complained that homework's benefits are dubious. Meanwhile many teachers argue that take-home lessons are key to helping students learn. Now, as schools are shifting to the new (and hotly debated) Common Core curriculum standards, educators, administrators and researchers are turning a fresh eye toward the question of homework's value.




a paragraph on homework is necessary



Homework can indeed produce academic benefits, such as increased understanding and retention of the material, says Duke University social psychologist Harris Cooper, PhD, one of the nation's leading homework researchers. But not all students benefit. In a review of studies published from 1987 to 2003, Cooper and his colleagues found that homework was linked to better test scores in high school and, to a lesser degree, in middle school. Yet they found only faint evidence that homework provided academic benefit in elementary school (Review of Educational Research, 2006).


Then again, test scores aren't everything. Homework proponents also cite the nonacademic advantages it might confer, such as the development of personal responsibility, good study habits and time-management skills. But as to hard evidence of those benefits, "the jury is still out," says Mollie Galloway, PhD, associate professor of educational leadership at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. "I think there's a focus on assigning homework because [teachers] think it has these positive outcomes for study skills and habits. But we don't know for sure that's the case."


Beyond that point, kids don't absorb much useful information, Cooper says. In fact, too much homework can do more harm than good. Researchers have cited drawbacks, including boredom and burnout toward academic material, less time for family and extracurricular activities, lack of sleep and increased stress.


In a recent study of Spanish students, Rubén Fernández-Alonso, PhD, and colleagues found that students who were regularly assigned math and science homework scored higher on standardized tests. But when kids reported having more than 90 to 100 minutes of homework per day, scores declined (Journal of Educational Psychology, 2015).


"At all grade levels, doing other things after school can have positive effects," Cooper says. "To the extent that homework denies access to other leisure and community activities, it's not serving the child's best interest."


A 2014 report by the Brookings Institution examined the question of homework, comparing data from a variety of sources. That report cited findings from a 2012 survey of first-year college students in which 38.4 percent reported spending six hours or more per week on homework during their last year of high school. That was down from 49.5 percent in 1986 (The Brown Center Report on American Education, 2014).


The Brookings report also explored survey data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, which asked 9-, 13- and 17-year-old students how much homework they'd done the previous night. They found that between 1984 and 2012, there was a slight increase in homework for 9-year-olds, but homework amounts for 13- and 17-year-olds stayed roughly the same, or even decreased slightly.


Yet other evidence suggests that some kids might be taking home much more work than they can handle. Robert Pressman, PhD, and colleagues recently investigated the 10-minute rule among more than 1,100 students, and found that elementary-school kids were receiving up to three times as much homework as recommended. As homework load increased, so did family stress, the researchers found (American Journal of Family Therapy, 2015).


Many high school students also seem to be exceeding the recommended amounts of homework. Pope and Galloway recently surveyed more than 4,300 students from 10 high-achieving high schools. Students reported bringing home an average of just over three hours of homework nightly (Journal of Experiential Education, 2013).


Yet homework can be a problem at the other end of the socioeconomic spectrum as well. Kids from wealthier homes are more likely to have resources such as computers, Internet connections, dedicated areas to do schoolwork and parents who tend to be more educated and more available to help them with tricky assignments. Kids from disadvantaged homes are more likely to work at afterschool jobs, or to be home without supervision in the evenings while their parents work multiple jobs, says Lea Theodore, PhD, a professor of school psychology at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. They are less likely to have computers or a quiet place to do homework in peace.


One point researchers agree on is that for all students, homework quality matters. But too many kids are feeling a lack of engagement with their take-home assignments, many experts say. In Pope and Galloway's research, only 20 percent to 30 percent of students said they felt their homework was useful or meaningful.


But critics say those skills can be developed with many fewer hours of homework each week. Why assign 50 math problems, Pope asks, when 10 would be just as constructive? One Advanced Placement biology teacher she worked with through Challenge Success experimented with cutting his homework assignments by a third, and then by half. "Test scores didn't go down," she says. "You can have a rigorous course and not have a crazy homework load."


Still, changing the culture of homework won't be easy. Teachers-to-be get little instruction in homework during their training, Pope says. And despite some vocal parents arguing that kids bring home too much homework, many others get nervous if they think their child doesn't have enough. "Teachers feel pressured to give homework because parents expect it to come home," says Galloway. "When it doesn't, there's this idea that the school might not be doing its job."


We all are well aware of the word Homework. Every day we spend three to four hours at home after school hours completing our homework. It is like a great tension in our minds until it gets completed. Parents are also involved fully or partially with children in getting their homework completed. Some students love doing homework and many others hate getting homework. If we talk about the opinion of students and parents on this topic we find a great variation in their opinions. I think it is an important and interesting topic to be discussed.


Homework is essential work for the students in school life. Every day students get some work like learning the question answers, filling the worksheets; complete the exercises, etc. as the homework of the day. Homework is appreciated by some students while many of them do not love doing homework.


Homework is necessary for the students as it aids in learning. It enhances the problem-solving and thinking skills of the students. Moreover, it helps the students in doing the regular revision of the things taught in the classroom. The most important thing is that the homework given to the students should not be too much. An excessive amount of homework given to the students causes frustration and stress in the students.


Mostly the students do not like doing homework as it appears as a burden to them. This basically depends upon the type of homework given to the students. The homework becomes really boring if they are lengthy. The interest and efficiency of doing homework in students are increased if the homework is converted into smart homework. The act of adding creativity to the homework makes the homework to be interesting for the students. They will love to do the work instead of escaping from doing the homework.


The mode of education has shifted from offline to online mode during the Covid-19 pandemic. Everything is to be done from home only. Earlier the students used to go to schools for attending classes and completed their homework at home. At present, it is very dull and boring to attend online classes and then do homework after finishing classes.


Yes, homework is necessary for students because it gives us the opportunity for more practice, thus more learning. The introduction of technology and creativity has helped in making homework interesting as well as easy for the students.


Homework is the best way to initiate the habit of self-study in us. Whatever we learn in our classes is not sufficient for us but requires few hours of self-study for understanding that matter. Initially, we hate homework but realize its value as we grow up and reach higher classes. It fosters our communication with our parents and teachers as they are helping us in completing and correcting our homework. I must say that in my opinion homework is essential for every student. The basic issue lies in excessive homework that becomes a burden for students and thus must be optimized.


There are many advantages of homework for students in comparison to the disadvantages. The homework should be less that can be completed fast. Excessive homework requires a lot of time. It is not healthy to work and study all time.


It used to be that students were the only ones complaining about the practice of assigning homework. For years, teachers and parents thought that homework was a necessary tool when educating children. But studies about the effectiveness of homework have been conflicting and inconclusive, leading some adults to argue that homework should become a thing of the past.


According to Duke professor Harris Cooper, it's important that students have homework. His meta-analysis of homework studies showed a correlation between completing homework and academic success, at least in older grades. He recommends following a "10 minute rule": students should receive 10 minutes of homework per day in first grade, and 10 additional minutes each subsequent year, so that by twelfth grade they are completing 120 minutes of homework daily.


But his analysis didn't prove that students did better because they did homework; it simply showed a correlation. This could simply mean that kids who do homework are more committed to doing well in school. Cooper also found that some research showed that homework caused physical and emotional stress, and created negative attitudes about learning. He suggested that more research needed to be done on homework's effect on kids.


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